Edith Hahn Beer Quotes

Enjoy the top 58 famous quotes, sayings and quotations by Edith Hahn Beer.

Edith Hahn Beer Quotes

We were taught that the French were our archenemies, that the Italians were traitors, that Austria had lost the First World War only because of a "stab in the back"—but I must tell you, we were never sure who had done the stabbing.
— Edith Hahn Beer —

I thought: Now I am like Dante. I walk through hell, but I am not burning.

— Edith Hahn Beer

One class. No masters. No slaves. No black. No white. No Jew. No Christian. One race
The human race.

— Edith Hahn Beer

It was the individuals who made their own rules in this situation. No one forced them to behave in an unkind manner. The opportunity to act decently toward us was always available to them. Only the tiniest number of them ever used it.

— Edith Hahn Beer

When an idea is idiotic to begin with, its applications never make any sense.

— Edith Hahn Beer

The Nazi radio blamed us for every filthy evil thing in this world. The Nazis called us subhuman and, in the next breath, superhuman; accused us of plotting to murder them, to rob them blind; declared that they had to conquer the world to prevent us from conquering the world. The radio said that we must be dispossessed of all we owned; that my father, who had dropped dead while working, had not really worked for our pleasant flat-the leather chairs in the dining room, the earrings in my mother's ears-that he had somehow stolen them from Christian Austria, which now had every right to take them back.

— Edith Hahn Beer

Mama had a decayed tooth that was killing her. Our Jewish dentist was no longer allowed to practice, but with Pepi's help, Mama found an Aryan dentist who would pull the tooth. He wanted gold. Mama gave him a gold chain. He wanted more. She gave him another. He wanted more. She gave him her last. Three gold chains for one tooth.

— Edith Hahn Beer

Man is a greater thing than you have thought him,

— Edith Hahn Beer

Being sick never worked as an excuse at the asparagus plantation at Osterburg. For example, the pregnant girl wanted to go home. She cried and pleaded. The doctor declared her fit for work. She willfully threw up in the fields every morning. An official from the work department, stuffed into his Nazi uniform, finally gave her permission to leave, but not for home-for Poland.

— Edith Hahn Beer

Through her agreement.

— Edith Hahn Beer

I could not make the war seem real for myself. Even though I had heard about the Nazi bombing of cities in Spain, I couldn't imagine an air attack on unarmed civilians. Remember, there were still horses on the roads of rural Germany at that time. Very few people understood what modern war would be like.

— Edith Hahn Beer

You will ask how I felt about spending so much time with people who supported the Hitler regime. I will tell you that, since I had absolutely no choice in the matter, I no longer dared to think about it. To be in Germany at that time, pretending to be an Aryan, meant that you automatically socialized with Nazis. To me, they were all Nazis, whether they belonged to the party or not. For me to have made distinctions at that time-to say Hilde was a "good" Nazi and the registrar was a "bad" Nazi-would have been silly and dangerous, because the good ones could turn you in as easily and capriciously as the bad ones could save your life.

— Edith Hahn Beer

Obituary for Edith Hahn Beer from the Times (UK) This obituary was published in the March 26, 2009, edition of the London Times. Reprinted with permission of the Times, London. EDITH HAHN-BEER escaped probable extermination as a Jew in wartime Germany by assuming a

— Edith Hahn Beer

You must understand that at that time, the concentration camps were prisons where opponents of the Nazi regime were detained. Von Schuschnigg was in a concentration camp; so was Bruno Bettelheim for a time. The inmates were made to work at hard labor and lived in dreadful conditions, but they often came back from these places. Not until the 1940s did the words "concentration camp" come to stand for monstrous cruelty and almost certain death. Nobody even imagined there would one day be a death camp like Auschwitz.

— Edith Hahn Beer

Children by the Nazi forces, for slave labor

— Edith Hahn Beer

They wanted to know, you see. They were afraid that with our typical Austrian faces, we might be able to pass. They didn't want to be fooled. Even then, in the 1920s, they wanted to be able to tell who was a Jew.

— Edith Hahn Beer

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